Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Meat Fridays or Get Your Meat On!


The Chef is a carnivore.  The man loves meat.  He likes a good vegetable or potato too, but he would be perfectly content with an entree of beef, a side dish of pork, and assorted sausages for dessert.



He also loves the Church.  He studies liturgical nuances the way I shop for sales.  He relishes a good discussion on matters of faith and morals.  He prides himself on being the one that people call to clarify the Church's teachings on fast and abstinence.  (Chicken broth is ok.  Bacon bits are not.)  And he loves to announce Meat Fridays via his Facebook page.

Meat Fridays are Fridays, typically days of abstinence from meat, that are either solemnities (high feast days) or the Friday that falls with in the Octave of Easter.  And this Friday falls during the Octave of Easter, so, yup, you guessed it!  It's Meat Friday! 

According to the Chef, to eat or serve fish on a Meat Friday is as bad as serving meat on a Fish Friday.  He believes it is our duty as Catholics to consume meat, preferably multiple forms of meat, on these special days.

For your meat eating pleasure, I will now list the dates of the 2012 Meat Fridays in red, as well as other solemnities that do not fall on Fridays this year, but should they fall on Friday, they would indeed be Meat Fridays.

Solemnity of Mary the Mother of God, January 1st
Epiphany, January 8th
Saint Joseph, March 19th
Annunciation, March 26th
Easter Sunday and Its Octave (In 2012, this is Sunday, April 8th, through Saturday, April 14th, including Meat Friday, April 13th.)
Ascension, May 17th
Sacred Heart, Meat Friday, June 15th
Birth of John the Baptist, June 24th
Saints Peter and Paul, Meat Friday, June 29th
Assumption, August 15th
All Saints, November 1st
Immaculate Conception, December 8th
Christmas, December 25th 


So, defrost the fatted calf and celebrate the Resurrection! 

12 comments:

  1. We are big fans of Meat Fridays! My oldest son especially. He is going to be jazzed about your handy dandy list there. And I tell my kids all the time that the Church COMMANDS us to celebrate the Solemnities. Who are we to say "no"?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Since my college days, I've been celebrating Easter Friday as "Meating Friday", the first Friday after Lent, and reminding people that if they don't eat meat on that day, it's tantamount to a denial of the resurrection.

    One year, I took down a porterhouse steak with all the trimmings in honor of the feast. Another year, I hosted a rib cook-off competition, and we all ate about 29lbs of ribs together.

    I also celebrate the Friday immediately before Ash Wednesday as "Low Friday", with a bacon festival.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wait! You can eat bacon the Friday immediately before Ash Wednesday? How can this be?

      Also, I would love to be a guest judge at your rib cook-off, or anyone's cook-off for that matter.

      Delete
  3. Chicken broth is OK? Is this in the Catechism?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Not in the Catechism, in canon law.

    Basically, in the 1917 code you could not eat soups made from meat. A revision to this part of the law happened in 1966 but omitted the phrase on soups made from meat. Under canon law this is called derogation and the part of the former law that is omitted in the new law is no longer binding.

    Here is a link to a good description of how this works:

    http://www.jimmyakin.org/2005/02/soups_redux.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Earth shattering. Literally. You should post this on Facebook so I can share it. I have already given a few friends the wrong information this year.

      Delete
  5. Can. 1251 Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays, unless a solemnity should fall on a Friday.

    So... where did we get this Friday, since it is not a solemnity? Seems like it should be a day of abstinence, right? I trust you, but I'm not seeing it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This Friday is a solemnity because it falls in the Octave of Easter. Easter and the following seven days are all solemnities. That's why we say the Gloria every day.

      "The Church celebrates this feast beginning at the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday and through the Octave of Easter. From Easter Sunday to Easter Saturday, every day is another Easter, so high is this feast."

      http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1042

      Now, that's not a canon law site, so I'll get the Chef to find more for you.

      Delete
    2. Oh cool. This is sufficient. Thank you.

      Delete
  6. I was googling places and came across your blog. I am trying to find out if, being in the Octave of Epiphany - can we have meat this Friday???
    This articles speaks of the Octave of Epiphany.
    http://acatholiclife.blogspot.ca/2012/01/understading-epiphanytide-octave-of.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FmyST+%28A+Catholic+Life%29

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately, though there is an Octave of the Epiphany, the Epiphany is not a solemnity, so no Meat Friday. So sad.

      Delete

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Meat Fridays or Get Your Meat On!


The Chef is a carnivore.  The man loves meat.  He likes a good vegetable or potato too, but he would be perfectly content with an entree of beef, a side dish of pork, and assorted sausages for dessert.



He also loves the Church.  He studies liturgical nuances the way I shop for sales.  He relishes a good discussion on matters of faith and morals.  He prides himself on being the one that people call to clarify the Church's teachings on fast and abstinence.  (Chicken broth is ok.  Bacon bits are not.)  And he loves to announce Meat Fridays via his Facebook page.

Meat Fridays are Fridays, typically days of abstinence from meat, that are either solemnities (high feast days) or the Friday that falls with in the Octave of Easter.  And this Friday falls during the Octave of Easter, so, yup, you guessed it!  It's Meat Friday! 

According to the Chef, to eat or serve fish on a Meat Friday is as bad as serving meat on a Fish Friday.  He believes it is our duty as Catholics to consume meat, preferably multiple forms of meat, on these special days.

For your meat eating pleasure, I will now list the dates of the 2012 Meat Fridays in red, as well as other solemnities that do not fall on Fridays this year, but should they fall on Friday, they would indeed be Meat Fridays.

Solemnity of Mary the Mother of God, January 1st
Epiphany, January 8th
Saint Joseph, March 19th
Annunciation, March 26th
Easter Sunday and Its Octave (In 2012, this is Sunday, April 8th, through Saturday, April 14th, including Meat Friday, April 13th.)
Ascension, May 17th
Sacred Heart, Meat Friday, June 15th
Birth of John the Baptist, June 24th
Saints Peter and Paul, Meat Friday, June 29th
Assumption, August 15th
All Saints, November 1st
Immaculate Conception, December 8th
Christmas, December 25th 


So, defrost the fatted calf and celebrate the Resurrection! 

12 comments:

  1. We are big fans of Meat Fridays! My oldest son especially. He is going to be jazzed about your handy dandy list there. And I tell my kids all the time that the Church COMMANDS us to celebrate the Solemnities. Who are we to say "no"?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Since my college days, I've been celebrating Easter Friday as "Meating Friday", the first Friday after Lent, and reminding people that if they don't eat meat on that day, it's tantamount to a denial of the resurrection.

    One year, I took down a porterhouse steak with all the trimmings in honor of the feast. Another year, I hosted a rib cook-off competition, and we all ate about 29lbs of ribs together.

    I also celebrate the Friday immediately before Ash Wednesday as "Low Friday", with a bacon festival.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wait! You can eat bacon the Friday immediately before Ash Wednesday? How can this be?

      Also, I would love to be a guest judge at your rib cook-off, or anyone's cook-off for that matter.

      Delete
  3. Chicken broth is OK? Is this in the Catechism?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Not in the Catechism, in canon law.

    Basically, in the 1917 code you could not eat soups made from meat. A revision to this part of the law happened in 1966 but omitted the phrase on soups made from meat. Under canon law this is called derogation and the part of the former law that is omitted in the new law is no longer binding.

    Here is a link to a good description of how this works:

    http://www.jimmyakin.org/2005/02/soups_redux.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Earth shattering. Literally. You should post this on Facebook so I can share it. I have already given a few friends the wrong information this year.

      Delete
  5. Can. 1251 Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays, unless a solemnity should fall on a Friday.

    So... where did we get this Friday, since it is not a solemnity? Seems like it should be a day of abstinence, right? I trust you, but I'm not seeing it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This Friday is a solemnity because it falls in the Octave of Easter. Easter and the following seven days are all solemnities. That's why we say the Gloria every day.

      "The Church celebrates this feast beginning at the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday and through the Octave of Easter. From Easter Sunday to Easter Saturday, every day is another Easter, so high is this feast."

      http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1042

      Now, that's not a canon law site, so I'll get the Chef to find more for you.

      Delete
    2. Oh cool. This is sufficient. Thank you.

      Delete
  6. I was googling places and came across your blog. I am trying to find out if, being in the Octave of Epiphany - can we have meat this Friday???
    This articles speaks of the Octave of Epiphany.
    http://acatholiclife.blogspot.ca/2012/01/understading-epiphanytide-octave-of.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FmyST+%28A+Catholic+Life%29

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately, though there is an Octave of the Epiphany, the Epiphany is not a solemnity, so no Meat Friday. So sad.

      Delete